Advantage of Foresight

Writing

Writing Prompt: You’ve been granted the power to predict the future! The catch — each time you use your power, it costs you one day (as in, you’ll live one day less). How would you use this power, it at all?

Even if there wasn’t a catch this would be a power that I wouldn’t use. On first thought I said, “yeah, that would be great” but the fact that days off my life would taken from my life is jarring, especially as a chronically ill person who fills like her days have diminished due to illness… the unknown days that I have (although not always good days) are precious to me.

Now back to the question at hand. I am a nosey person… If I had this power without consequences I would use it all the time, I would want to see if I would ever be healthy, would I ever find my “soul mate”, then it would get to the point where I would get impatient with TV shows and want to see the next episode… by using this power would constantly be looking into the future and totally ignoring my present. I could go on and on… but honestly Margaret Atwood says it better than me,

“If you knew what was going to happen, if you knew everything that was going to happen next—if you knew in advance the consequences of your own actions—you’d be doomed. You’d be ruined as God. You’d be a stone. You’d never eat or drink or laugh or get out of bed in the morning. You’d never love anyone, ever again. You’d never dare to.”
― Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

 

Until Next Time….

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Former Harvard Sex Blogger: My Ex-Boyfriend Leaking Nude Pictures of Me Changed Who I Am—Forever

TIME

In 2008, there were no words for what happened to me. Today we call what happened to Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities—the public nonconsensual distribution of sexually explicit photos—revenge porn or cyber bullying or online harassment. I wasn’t naive. I’d been slut-shamed before. But I never considered that people would think my willingness to talk about sexuality precluded me from the expectation of privacy.

I was in my third year at Harvard, when an ex-boyfriend posted a gallery of nude photos he had taken of me eight months earlier. IvyGate, “an Ivy League blog covering news, gossip, sex, and sports,” picked up the story first, which would later become one of the site’s most popular posts. At the time, I was already in the press for writing what some described as a “sex blog” and it made me well known enough within a certain community—overachieving teenage girls, other Ivy…

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